Categories
Blood Cancer

Because of research, Mia is celebrating Christmas with her family [Video]

When Mia was diagnosed with blood cancer, her parents were told there was a 50:50 chance that she’d survive until her 5th birthday.On December 15th, 2021, Mia turns 5 years old.Mia’s mum, Anj, tells us their difficult journey to an incredible milestone, and how she believes research is key to making sure more families are together at Christmas.You can donate to our research here:https://bloodcancer.org.uk/mia

Categories
Blood Cancer

Ask the Experts- Community Voices: What helps me through the festive period [Video]

Join our panellists made up of people affected by blood cancer as they share their experiences of living with a blood cancer diagnosis over the festive period.This session will explore how people have coped with a blood cancer diagnosis or being in hospital over Christmas, remembering lost loved ones, and navigating relationships with friends and family members. Our conversation will focus on managing practically, emotionally, and physically during this period and the benefits and challenges that surround this.This session will be useful to you if you are looking forward to the festive period or are feeling anxious about it.

Categories
Blood Cancer

Because children like Mia need your help this Christmas [Video]

Mia was diagnosed with blood cancer at just 7 months old, and spent the first Christmas she could remember in hostpital. Please make a donation, so that more children like Mia can spend Christmas with their family https://bloodcancer.org.uk/get-involved/ways-give/christmas-appeal-main/

Categories
Pediatric Cancer

Episode 38: Adapting and Scaling In-Person Programs Online, with Constanza Roeder [Video]

When Covid shut down non-essential access to hospitals, it effectively shut down all of Hearts Need Art’s programming, as it did for so many other service-based nonprofits. Artists were no longer able to perform for patients, patients were no longer able to get much-needed emotional support, and they couldn’t deliver on their promise to donors. This easily could have been the end of the line for the arts in health nonprofit that Constanza Roeder created just a few years prior, based on her first-hand experience of being a cancer patient and the support that got her through it.Instead, the young non-technical, resource-strapped organization took on the challenge with their greatest asset: creativity. They developed new programs to meet the new constraints and, in the process, created a significantly more scalable system for delivering their programming that creates stronger connections between their work and their donors, provides a greater continuity of care for their clients, and allows them to reach exponentially more people in need… without over-taxing their resources.Hearts Need Art founder Constanza Roeder joins the show to share her story and break down how any organization can do the same. ** Episode Links and Shownotes: https://nphf.show/ep38 **Concepts and Takeaways:• 2:20 — Constanza’s story began with her own health struggles as an adolescent leukemia patient. But it wasn’t until she volunteered in a hospital as an adult that she realized that there was something lacking in the system. This was the call to action in her hero’s journey, which led to the formation of Hearts Need Art.• 5:53 — We don’t always respond to the first call to action in life. Sometimes it takes many calls before we answer the call. Often, when that call relates to our greatest weaknesses, we find our greatest strengths.• 7:21 — Hearts Need Art was serving patients in hospitals, in person. The pandemic upended their ability to provide their services and they had to get creative.In response, they took two weeks to overhaul their programming and create new, digital-first programs that served their community and had additional benefits.• 9:26 — They designed an online system for clients to schedule sessions with their favorite artists through Zoom. They also invited supporters in on the livestreams, allowing them unprecedented access to the work being done.• 11:05 — They created “Gratitude Grams” — an entirely new online program supporting healthcare workers, who needed moral and emotional support as they were dealing with the crisis on the frontlines. — The program allows anyone to submit a thank you note to healthcare workers that would get delivered digitally by Hearts Need Art, along with creative content from musicians, writers or artists. — Healthcare workers from over 30 institutions have signed up to receive these messages.• 13:12 — Without any geographical constraints, Gratitude Grams has allowed people all over the country to participate, and for the program to scale at practically no additional resource cost to Hearts Need Art.• 14:33 — Creating online programs like these doesn’t have to be an extensive or expensive endeavor. In their case, Hearts Need Art used off-the-shelf, free and nearly free tools like Google Forms, Google Sheets and Zapier to automate most of the processes.• 16:45 — Opting to participate in the program is just the beginning. Hearts Need Art includes data collection tools in the process to continually get feedback that they can take right back to their program managers for adjustments, and their supporters for validation. — They determine ahead of time what areas of impact they want to measure, and then include a quick survey with every message that allows them to collect the data and stories they need. — The program has won an award from the National Organization for Arts in Health• 20:48 — The inability to deliver on their original promise to donors (of in-person programming), they were naturally worried that most donors would drop off. Through careful communication and setting new expectations, Hearts Need Art was actually able to retain and grow their overall donor base in 2020 and has grown even more in 2021. — They were also, therefore, keep their artists employed at a time when artists were struggling.• 29:22 — While it doesn’t replicate the in-person benefits completely, the scalability has allowed Hearts Need Art to reach more people and has put them on a path to potentially expanding well beyond what they were able to do prior to the pandemic.• 31:37 — Constanza attributes much of their success to a few factors, including having a young, creative team around her that is always looking for new, creative ways to do things. Technology is available and can be outsourced, and can often be found for free or at a discount for nonprofits.

Categories
Lung Cancer

Lung Cancer Screening Patient Education [Video]

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends yearly lung cancer screening for people ages 50 to 80 who have a 20 pack-year or more smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. For more information about Massey’s Lung Cancer Screening Program or to schedule an appointment, please call (804) 827-LUNG (5864).Website: masseycancercenter.orgFacebook: http://www.facebook.com/VCUMasseyCancerCenterTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/vcumasseyVCU Massey Cancer Center is one of only 71 National Cancer Institute-designated institutions in the country that leads and shapes America’s cancer research efforts. Working with all kinds of cancers, Massey conducts basic, translational and clinical cancer research, provides state-of-the-art treatments and clinical trials, and promotes cancer prevention and education. Since 1974, Massey has served as an internationally recognized center of excellence. It offers the most cancer clinical trials in Virginia and serves patients at multiple locations. Its 1,000-plus researchers, clinicians and staff members are dedicated to improving the quality of human life by developing and delivering effective means to prevent, control and ultimately cure cancer. Visit Massey online at masseycancercenter.org or call 877-4-MASSEY for more information.

Categories
Skin Cancer

Help Ashiq Hussain Malik Fight Skin Cancer! #shorts [Video]

Help Ashiq Hussain Malik Fight Skin Cancer! #shortsDonate At – https://bit.ly/SaveBATPlease Share As Much As Possible!#fundraiser #giveindia #important

Categories
Lung Cancer

Turning the Tide on Lung Cancer in the African American Community [Video]

In honor of Lung Cancer Awareness Month, Massey researchers Alex Krist, M.D., and Rashelle Hayes, Ph.D., discuss tobacco disparities, lung health and screening for lung cancer. The presentation includes a screening of the short film Black Lives, Black Lungs.Website: masseycancercenter.orgFacebook: http://www.facebook.com/VCUMasseyCancerCenterTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/vcumasseyVCU Massey Cancer Center is one of only 71 National Cancer Institute-designated institutions in the country that leads and shapes America’s cancer research efforts. Working with all kinds of cancers, Massey conducts basic, translational and clinical cancer research, provides state-of-the-art treatments and clinical trials, and promotes cancer prevention and education. Since 1974, Massey has served as an internationally recognized center of excellence. It offers the most cancer clinical trials in Virginia and serves patients at multiple locations. Its 1,000-plus researchers, clinicians and staff members are dedicated to improving the quality of human life by developing and delivering effective means to prevent, control and ultimately cure cancer. Visit Massey online at masseycancercenter.org or call 877-4-MASSEY for more information.

Categories
Pancreatic Cancer

Rick Schiffhauer Pancreatic Cancer Story 2021 [Video]

Please Share and help raise awareness for Pancreatic CancerDonate here – https://www.flipcause.com/secure/cause_pdetails/MTA4NDM3Buy Apparel:Shirt – https://www.smashitsports.com/shop/knockout-pancreatic-cancer-short-sleeve-shirt/Hoodie – https://www.smashitsports.com/shop/knockout-pancreatic-cancer-defender-fleece-hoodie/100% of proceeds go towards Pancreatic Cancer ResearchPancreatic Cancer. It’s the third leading cause of cancer deaths, just behind lung cancer and colon cancer. And at just 57-years-old, Rick Schiffhauer found out he was stage four. “And I immediately started thinking about my children,” says Rick. “I’ve got five. Three adults and two little ones, ten and eleven. So I thought about my little girls and my wife. And worried about their future here without me. I was more or less thinking the worst. What happens to me? What’s going to happen to my family? What am I going to do? Where do I turn?” That’s when he was introduced to the Seena Magowitz Foundation.“Roger Magowitz called me,” says Rick. “And he and I developed a friendship.”Roger and his team directed him to get treatment at HonorHealth in Arizona. It was there, with encouragement from friends and family, that his attitude began to change. “I credit them will a lot of my success,” he says. “I truly do. I believe in the power of prayer. I believe in God’s plan for all of us. And I can’t thank those people enough for all of their support. It took me a while to get to the point where I knew that I could beat this, and I would beat this, and I’m 100% sure of that.”“There’s been a couple of days as you can imagine punched him in the throat a little bit,” says Rick’s best friend, Don Cooper. “But I would say the most amazing piece about this is he’s been upbeat the rest of the way; he’s been positive the rest of the way. He’s said, you know, ‘Hey I’m going to win, and it’s going to help me bring awareness, it’s going to help me raise money, it’s going to help me help other people.’” Rick has already raised over $70,000 for The Seena Magowitz Foundation to fund clinical trials.“We just want to help people,” says Rick. “And we want to find a cure for this nasty disease.” “Pocket change, big donors, all of us that can be involved in this,” echoed Don. “Every time we take a step like this, we’re helping someone else, and you just don’t know. A year ago, I didn’t think about pancreatic cancer. It hadn’t affected anyone. Now, it affects one of my best friends. It could affect me tomorrow. The thought of what you can do today might save your own life, a year from now. It may save your best friend, your father, your brother’s life, or your sisters twelve months from now.” “Don’t give up,” encouraged Rick. “Because miracles happen. Why not you? Why not me?”

Categories
Blood Cancer

Blood cancer: what are the common symptoms? [Video]

Blood cancer symptoms can be quite vague which can make it a difficult cancer to diagnose. People with blood cancer may experience a range of symptoms, including:weight loss that’s unexplainedbruising or bleeding that’s unexplainedlumps or swellingsshortness of breath (breathlessness)drenching night sweatsinfections that are persistent, recurrent or severefever (37.5°C or above) that is unexplainedrash or itchy skin that’s unexplainedpain in your bones, joints or abdomen (stomach area)tiredness that doesn’t improve with rest or sleep (fatigue)paleness (pallor) – the skin under your lower eyelid looks white rather than pink.You can find out more about blood cancer symptoms here:https://bloodcancer.org.uk/understanding-blood-cancer/blood-cancer-signs-symptoms/

Categories
Blood Cancer

Help Mr Natarajan Raise Funds To Fight Acute Myeloid Leukemia! #shorts [Video]

Donate At – https://bit.ly/SaveMRI Please Share As Much As Possible!#impactguru #fundraiser #urgent