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Blood Cancer

Genome characterization of T-ALL patients [Video]

Petri Pölönen, PhD, St. Jude’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, discusses the results of a study which used whole genome sequencing (WGS), whole exome sequencing (WES), and transcriptome sequencing to characterize the genome of pediatric patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Dr Pölönen highlights novel T-ALL driver genes and genomic alterations that were identified. This interview took place at the European Hematology Association (EHA) Congress 2022 held in Vienna, Austria.

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Blood Cancer

New research areas in the treatment of AML [Video]

Naveen Pemmaraju, MD, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, explains the areas of excitement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) research. Important advances have occurred when AML has been broken down into subsets of molecularly similar groups. For example, a subset of AML, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), can be treated with ATRA and arsenic. Dr Pemmaraju then highlights other key areas and their role in the future treatment of AML, and the importance of immunotherapies and combination therapies.This interview took place at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA.

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Blood Cancer

RNA profiling of circulating tumor cells in myeloma patients [Video]

Elizabeth D. Lightbody, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, discusses the value of investigating circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in patients with multiple myeloma. CTCs are present at all stages of the myeloma disease continuum, and CTC levels increase with disease progression. Dr Lightbody discusses some research in which single-cell RNA sequencing was performed on a subset of patients and healthy donors to analyze CTC profiles, and the value of using CTCs as a biomarker of disease. This interview took place at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA.

Categories
Blood Cancer

The PANGEA model: improving risk stratification in multiple myeloma [Video]

In this video, Annie Cowan, BA, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, discusses the PANGEA model which uses continuous variables to predict the risk of progression for patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering myeloma. Ms Cowan first explains how the PANGEA model has improved and compares it to the current gold standard, which is the 20/2/20 model and the 2014 IMWG MGUS criteria. Following this, Ms Cowan details the additional variables and statistical analyses used in the PANGEA model, and how these factors improve the ability of this model to predict a patient’s risk of progression. Ms Cowan then discusses recent research which focuses on how to examine risk of progression without the use of bone marrow biopsies, and the various algorithms used in the PANGEA model. To conclude, Ms Cowan highlights the ability of this model to be used on an individual basis, and the role it will have in improving risk progression for patients in the future. This interview took place at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA.