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Skin Cancer

When she filmed herself zapping zits, Dr Pimple Popper never expected to become a global sensation [Video]

When Dr Sandra Lee started an Instagram account in 2014 to showcase her work as a dermatologist, people were only mildly interested in how she administered Botox and tackled skin cancer.

But after she posted a clip of a blackhead being squeezed, something almost all of us have done in the privacy of our own homes, people got very, very excited.

As Dr Lee began posting other grotesque but strangely satisfying videos of extractions of squishy blackheads, removing whiteheads as hard as pebbles and excising inflamed cysts the size of small volcanoes, her career as a social media star, well, erupted.

Seven years on, using the catchy nickname of Dr Pimple Popper, the 50-year-old has rock star status in the world of dermatology, with fans including Gwyneth Paltrow and Kim Kardashian — both self-confessed ‘popaholics’.

Dr Lee’s videos on her YouTube channel have been viewed an astonishing 1.8 billion times in total — she has …

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Skin Cancer

Update on Melanoma Skin Cancer & Opdivo Immunotherapy Treatments [Video]

I have Stage 3c melanoma skin cancer. I’ve had multiple surgeries, quarterly CT scans, needle biopsies and much more! This is an overview of everything I have gone through so far. I will have my 4th (of 12) treatment next week at Memorial Sloan Kettering. I am on Opdivo for 1 year. If you have any questions for you, leave it in the comments and I can get back to you. :-)—————————-Taken from Cancer.org August 2022 This explains exactly what I’ve been told by doctors and explains how it’s given to patients. Immunotherapy is the use of medicines to help a person’s own immune system recognize and destroy cancer cells more effectively. Several types of immunotherapy can be used to treat melanoma.Immune checkpoint inhibitors:An important part of the immune system is its ability to keep itself from attacking normal cells in the body. To do this, it uses “checkpoints,” which are proteins on immune cells that need to be turned on (or off) to start an immune response. Melanoma cells sometimes use these checkpoints to avoid being attacked by the immune system. But these drugs target the checkpoint proteins, helping to restore the immune response against melanoma cells.PD-1 inhibitors:Pembrolizumab (Keytruda) and nivolumab (Opdivo) are drugs that target PD-1, a protein on immune system cells called T cells that normally help keep these cells from attacking other cells in the body. By blocking PD-1, these drugs boost the immune response against melanoma cells. This can often shrink tumors and help people live longer.They can be used to treat melanomas:-That can’t be removed by surgery-That have spread to other parts of the body-After surgery (as adjuvant treatment) for certain stage II or III melanomas to try to lower the risk of the cancer coming backThese drugs are given as an intravenous (IV) infusion, typically every 2 to 6 weeks, depending on the drug and why it's being given.