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Prostate Cancer

Radiation and Hormone Therapy | Prostate Cancer | Mark Scholz, MD [Video]

In this video, PCRI's Alex asks Mark Scholz, MD, questions from our YouTube comments about radiation and hormone therapy for prostate cancer. Dr. Scholz is a medical oncologist specializing exclusively in prostate cancer. 0:07 What is the risk of developing secondary cancers after radiation for prostate cancer? 2:07 Is the use of SpaceOAR universal among radiation oncologists? What is the SpaceOAR process like? 3:34 Is taking testosterone safe after radiation and hormone therapy? 6:08 How does a man monitor if testosterone is safe? Can any physician order those kinds of blood tests? 6:31 If there is only one or two metastatic sites, should they be treated with radiation? 8:19 Is proton therapy cause fewer side effects (or have less risk of side effects) compared to other forms of radiation? 9:55 What is the optimal treatment for someone with a PSA of 13 and a Gleason 3+4? Don’t know your stage? Take the quiz: Visit http://www.prostatecancerstaging.org To learn more about prostate cancer visit http://www.pcri.org Sign up for our newsletter here to receive the latest updates on prostate cancer and the PCRI: https://pcri.org/join Who we are: The Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization that is dedicated to helping you research your treatment options. We understand that you have many questions, and we can help you find the answers that are specific to your case. All of our resources are designed by a multidisciplinary team of advocates and expert physicians, for patients. We believe that by educating yourself about the disease, you will have more productive interactions with your medical professionals and receive better individualized care. Feel free to explore our website or call our free helpline at 1 (800) 641-7274 with any questions that you have. Our Federal Tax ID # is 95-4617875 and qualifies for maximum charitable gift deductions by individual donors. The information on the Prostate Cancer Research Institute's YouTube channel is provided with the understanding that the Institute is not engaged in rendering medical advice or recommendation. The information provided in these videos should not replace consultations with qualified health care professionals to meet your individual medical needs. #ProstateCancer #MarkScholzMD #PCRI

Categories
Prostate Cancer

How Prostate Cancer AFFECT your Sexual Life #sexuallife #shorts [Video]

How prostate cancer affects a man’s sex life #prostatecancertreatment There is a myth circulating among men that prostate cancer treatment erases a man’s ability to achieve an erection leading to a sexless life. The hard truth is men should prepare themselves for the possibility of erectile dysfunction (ED) for a period of time after treatment. But, most men will make a recovery enjoying a satisfying sex life. Even if a man does develop persistent ED, it is possible to achieve satisfying orgasms without an erection. “Will my sex life return to normal?” The short answer to this is no, as there will be changes. But “no” does not mean it will forever be altered. It helps if a man looks at three different ways how prostate cancer can affect a man’s sexuality – desire, erectile dysfunction, and orgasm. 1. Sexual desire Before a man should even be thinking of the climax of sexual functioning or the ability to have an orgasm, he needs to address sexual desire. Just the psychological impact of prostate cancer treatments can be significant, leaving a man tired and irritable and not in the mood for sex. 2. Erectile dysfunction During and after prostate treatments, many men can experience ED, typically temporary. During recovery, medications like Viagra and Cialis will help. A man should always discuss with his doctor about how any treatments will affect his ability to have sex and to opt for ones that have the least effect on nerves and blood vessels important in achieving an erection. 3. Orgasm The good news is the vast majority of men will still be able to have an orgasm following prostate cancer treatment. And for some men, they’ll be pleasantly surprised to be experiencing pleasurable orgasms even without an erection. In conclusion Restoring an enjoyable sex life after prostate cancer treatment often depends on the type of treatment. When men and their partners know what to expect, they can accelerate recovery, experiment, and work together.

Categories
Prostate Cancer

Avoid red and processed meat says study to prostate cancer survivors #drdavidsamadi [Video]

All cancer survivors want advice on how to remain in remission. Prostate cancer survivors feel this same way. After undergoing rigorous treatment and then being told, “You’re in remission,” there are many concerns men have about avoiding a cancer recurrence. One of those concerns revolves around what foods to eat. These foods associated with a possible higher risk of advanced stage prostate cancer include: • Red meat, including beef, pork, and lamb • Processed meat, including sausage, salami, pepperoni, hot dogs, ham, bacon, and luncheon meats • Eggs with the yolk

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Prostate Cancer

Your secret weapon when fighting Prostate Cancer [Video]

By Dr. David Samadi Let’s face it; cancer can be scary and very bad. You may feel out-of-control or lost about what you should or should not be doing. But, no matter what cancer you are diagnosed with, just about every oncologist agrees with (and should recommend) is to exercise. Research shows that for most cancer patients, exercise is safe and helpful before, during, and after cancer treatment. Even with a cancer diagnosis, it’s important to keep physically active, if possible. The human body is made to move, in sickness (most of the time) and in health. Of course, depending on what type of cancer, there are various treatments to battle it. But, fighting cancer also requires an “empowered” patient rather than a “passive patient.” Not exercising can lead to loss of muscle mass and functional decline. Research shows it’s better to move more than to move less.

Categories
Prostate Cancer

How BPH Complicates Treatment for Prostate Cancer | Mark Scholz, MD [Video]

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (enlargement of the prostate) is a common cause of high PSA, thus causing prostate cancer-related concerns and confusion, and in extreme cases can cause urinary symptoms and can even preclude a patient from radiotherapy in the event that prostate cancer is also present (if the prostate cannot be reduces in size beforehand by medication). Here, Dr. Scholz discusses the different ways that BPH can confound prostate cancer screening, diagnosis, and staging so that patients will be aware if any of these scenarios happen to them. 00:07 How can BPH affect PSA and the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer? 3:20 How is BPH normally diagnosed? 4:34 Does BPH need to be resolved before radiotherapy for prostate cancer? 6:36 What are the surgical options for BPH? 7:23 How are urinary passageways evaluated prior to decisions about possible treatments? 8:29 How effective is radical prostatectomy for improving urinary flow? Don’t know your stage? Take the quiz: Visit http://www.prostatecancerstaging.org To learn more about prostate cancer visit http://www.pcri.org Sign up for our newsletter here to receive the latest updates on prostate cancer and the PCRI: https://pcri.org/join Who we are: The Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization that is dedicated to helping you research your treatment options. We understand that you have many questions, and we can help you find the answers that are specific to your case. All of our resources are designed by a multidisciplinary team of advocates and expert physicians, for patients. We believe that by educating yourself about the disease, you will have more productive interactions with your medical professionals and receive better individualized care. Feel free to explore our website or call our free helpline at 1 (800) 641-7274 with any questions that you have. Our Federal Tax ID # is 95-4617875 and qualifies for maximum charitable gift deductions by individual donors. The information on the Prostate Cancer Research Institute's YouTube channel is provided with the understanding that the Institute is not engaged in rendering medical advice or recommendation. The information provided in these videos should not replace consultations with qualified health care professionals to meet your individual medical needs. #ProstateCancer #MarkScholzMD #PCRI