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Skin Cancer

The Common Mouth Microbe That Keeps Popping Up in Tumors [Video]

The Common Mouth Microbe That Keeps Popping Up in TumorsDisclaimer :Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. https://tinyurl.com/TodaySciencology#Science #Technology #Invention Might brushing your teeth protect against cancer? The suggestion looks like it belongs in the pages of an unreliable tabloid, but scientific evidence for the link is strong and growing.   Take head and neck cancer, which kills some 450,000 people worldwide every year. It’s associated with smoking and drinking alcohol, which is one reason why the most common form of the disease, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), tends to cluster in under resourced areas. But plenty of people diagnosed with OSCC say they never drank nor smoked, so researchers have been looking for other possible causes.  One likely candidate is gum disease. A series of studies have identified periodontitis, a bacterial infection that eats away soft tissue and eventually bone around teeth, as a risk factor for OSCC. That might be because the disease changes the behavior of usually benign bugs that live in the mouth.  A study published late last year, for example, showed that mice infected with oral bacteria developed significantly larger and more numerous tumors compared to those not infected.   “The moment they sense that there’s some problem in the mouth, or that there is a decrease in the immune system, they respond and attack, because they’re looking for food,” says Jorge Frias-Lopez, a microbiologist at the University of Florida’s school of dentistry who studies the link between the oral microbiome and cancer.  And of the 700 or so bacterial species typically found in our mouths, scientists studying OSCC have zeroed in on a spindle-shaped suspect called Fusobacterium nucleatum. It’s early days, but researchers think F. nucleatum could explain why gum disease is linked to the development of oral tumors.   “All of the signs are leaning towards that this bacterium is in some way involved,” says Daniel Slade, a biochemist at Virginia Tech who studies the role bacteria play in cancer. “But it’s still an open question and needs more research on whether it can initiate cancer, or whether or not it’s accelerating cancer.”   Bacteria and tumors  Infectious microbes are reckoned to contribute to some 20 percent of human tumors. Viruses tend to soak up most of the blame, from the common human papillomaviruses that lead to cervical cancer to hepatitis B and C, which raise the risk of liver cancer.  “The concept that bacteria are important in cancer is new,” says Yvonne Hernandez-Kapila, a periodontologist at the University of California, San Francisco. When a link between colon cancer and the bacteria H. pylori was discovered in the 1990s, it triggered a search for other pathogenic and perhaps carcinogenic types, she says. “Then large population studies began to see some associations between bacteria, especially oral bacteria, and some cancers.”  Such association studies make up the bulk of the evidence that currently links OSCC to F. nucleatum. Starting in 1998, research on people with cancer has shown time and again that levels of the bacteria and bacterial gene expression are higher in OSCC tumors than in normal tissue.  “Fusobacterium nucleatum is actually present in many people,” says Hernandez-Kapila. “However, the relative numbers increase in cancer patients. We’ve shown that in oral and head and neck cancer patients.”  Association studies can only identify a correlation between the bacteria and disease, and famously, correlation does not equal causation. Without longitudinal studies to examine whether people with higher numbers of the bacteria go on to develop higher rates of cancer, scientists struggle to determine whether the bugs perhaps cause and worsen the disease, or if they are simply found alongside tumors. “There might be a role for Fusobacterium in promoting cancers, but I think it’s a kind of chicken and egg question,” says Miguel Reis Ferreira, a clinical oncologist at Guys and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust in London.   But scientists like Slade and Hernandez-Kapila believe that F. nucleatum does contribute to cancer. Th…

Categories
Skin Cancer

Melanoma – Science News and Research News [Video]

We create videos of interesting research papers, making research accessible to non- researchers, public and children alike. Today, we look at “Dedifferentiated Melanoma: A Diagnostic Histological Pitfall—Review of the Literature with Case Presentation”Please learn more about this and other topics.https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC43ZBT0-2oufGo81Lk8B2pg?sub_confirmation=1Authors: Gerardo Cazzato, Lucia Lospalluti, Anna Colagrande, Antonietta Cimmino, Paolo Romita, Caterina Foti, Aurora Demarco, Francesca Arezzo, Vera Loizzi, Gennaro Cormio, Sara Sablone, Leonardo Resta, Roberta Rossi and Giuseppe Ingravallohttps://www.mdpi.com/2296-3529/8/4/51Cazzato, G.; Lospalluti, L.; Colagrande, A.; Cimmino, A.; Romita, P.; Foti, C.; Demarco, A.; Arezzo, F.; Loizzi, V.; Cormio, G.; Sablone, S.; Resta, L.; Rossi, R.; Ingravallo, G. Dedifferentiated Melanoma: A Diagnostic Histological Pitfall—Review of the Literature with Case Presentation. Dermatopathology 2021, 8, 494-501. https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology8040051ht tps://do i.org/10.3390/dermatopathology 80400 51This is an Open Access Article. This video is an excerpt – not endorsed by the authors – of the original paper “Dedifferentiated Melanoma: A Diagnostic HistologicalPitfall—Review of the Literature with Case Presentation” by Gerardo Cazzato, Lucia Lospalluti, Anna Colagrande, Antonietta Cimmino, Paolo Romita, Caterina Foti, Aurora Demarco, Francesca Arezzo, Vera Loizzi, Gennaro Cormio, Sara Sablone, Leonardo Resta, Roberta Rossi and Giuseppe Ingravallo and is licensed under CC BY 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. a derivative of the original work https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology8040051. Copyright rests with respective authors and publishers. Thanks to all the authors and publishers for making this research public, thereby advancing science and innovation.

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Breast Cancer

SENSE.nano 2021: HemoSensis—Noninvasive point-of-care device for absolute tissue & cerebral oximetry [Video]

Valencia Koomson, Visiting Associate Professor, MIT Electrical Engineering & Computer ScienceAbstract:Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) techniques are creating pathways toward new applications to study biological tissue, including functional brain imaging, cerebral oximetry, stroke assessment, and optical mammography. NIRS methods are used to compute the concentrations of biological chromophores, such as oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, that have specific absorption spectra and indicate tissue oxygen perfusion.Koomson presents a non-invasive device implementing frequency-domain NIRS techniques for real-time monitoring of cerebral perfusion at the point of care. In the area of pediatric neurology, this tool enables assessment of hemorrhage. The HemoSensis tool implements advanced NIRS methods in a compact form factor by employing low-power solid-state optical devices and a patented system-on-chip (SoC) platform.Koomson presents the core technology and present system validation results. This tool advances the field of diffuse optical imaging by developing special techniques for data collection and analysis of NIRS data and enables dual-task measurements on ambulating subjects.Biography:Koomson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University. She completed the B.S. and M.Eng. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1998 and 1999, respectively. As a George C. Marshall Scholar, she studied at the University of Cambridge and received the M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering in 2000 and 2003, respectively. She is currently a 2021 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Visiting Professor at MIT.Koomson’s research lies at the intersection of biology, medicine, and electrical engineering. Her interests are in micro/nanoelectronic circuits and systems, biomedical devices, health informatics, and advanced nano-/microfluidic systems to probe intercellular communication. She has co-authored several book chapters, publications, and holds a patent for a system and method for measuring phase delay and amplitude of an optical signal in animal tissue. In 2005, she held an Adjunct Professor appointment at Howard University. She has held visiting appointments at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Boston University. Her research funding sponsors include NIH, NSF, DARPA, Catalyst Foundation, and W.M. Keck Foundation.Koomson is a George C. Marshall Scholar, Intel Foundation Scholar, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and 2010 recipient of the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award. She served as the Technical Program Chair of the 60th IEEE Midwest Symposium on Circuits in Systems. She is a member of several professional societies, technical program committees, and editorial boards for high impact journals.—————————————————- The 2021 SENSE.nano symposium focused on human subjects research, exploring how sensors and sensing systems can enable current medical studies and future clinical practice. SENSE.nano 2021 also celebrated the re-opening of the expanded Clinical Research Center (CRC) at MIT, now known as MIT’s Center for Clinical and Translational Research.Broken into two half-day webinars, SENSE.nano 2021 investigated human health through various technologies including motion capture, physiological monitoring, and sensing tools for the study of bodily fluids. Over a series of invited technical talks, panel discussions, presentations by MIT-launched startups, and views into MIT research today with current graduate students, this event provided needs context and solution perspectives in the domains of sensing for medical engineering and science, and for the care of humans in their environment.The 2021 SENSE.nano Symposium was sponsored by MIT.nano, MIT’s Center for Clinical and Translational Research, and the MIT Industrial Liaison Program (ILP).

Categories
Breast Cancer

Breast-Conserving Surgery; Hope for breast cancer patients – Dr. (Col) Mala Mathur Sharma [Video]

“Whenever we think of any breast disease, the first that comes to our mind is breast cancer. The fear of breast cancer is so much. Each one of us knows someone suffering from breast cancer. Why are we scared of breast cancer? Is it something to be scared of? Dr. Mala (Col) Mala Mathur Sharma, Surgical Oncologist and Breast Cancer Surgeon, Amrita Hospitals, Kochi is discussing breast cancer and its causes.In India, the incidents of breast cancer are rising. We should all be aware that all of us are at high risk of getting breast cancer, especially women. One needs to monitor self, examine their breasts and also one need to undergo timely screening to detect breast cancer at an early stage. If detected at an early stage, breast cancer is completely curable. Most of the breast lumps are not cancerous. They are called as benign breast lumps. These lumps are appearing due to hormonal activities on breast tissues. Sometimes these lumps tend to get bigger. In those cases, we need to remove these lumps. “#BreastCancer #AmritaHospital #BreastConservingSurgery

Categories
Brain Cancer

Generation Zapped Trailer [Video]

Watch film here: https://filmsforchange.stream/programs/generation-zappedGENERATION ZAPPED investigates the potential dangers of prolonged exposure to Radio Frequencies (RF) from wireless technology; it’s effects on our health and well-being, as well as the health and development of our children. From its links to breast and brain cancer, to its associations with increased infertility and genetic mutations related to autism and ADHD, to newly developed illnesses, such as Electrical Hyper-Sensitivity (EHS).Today we encounter a hundred thousand times the level of radiation from wireless technologies than we did decades ago. Yet the safety standards set by federal regulatory agencies are outdated. New wireless devices such as smart phones, tablets and baby monitors to the latest “Internet of Things” continue to enter the market without any proper pre-market testing or post-market monitoring. Too little is done to ensure public safety and awareness.So how can we uncover the facts and reduce our exposure to limit the associated health risks during this technological revolution? GENERATION ZAPPED attempts to do just that.

Categories
Blood Cancer

Albert Einstein Cancer Center | OPEN [Video]

OPEN Host Daren Jaime sits down with the Co-director of the Blood Cancer Institute & Associate Director of Basic Science at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Dr. Ulrich G. Steidl discussing the Outstanding Investigator Award to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to two related blood diseases.______For more information on BronxNet visit us at https://bronxnet.org/Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/BronxNetTVFollow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BronxnetTVFollow us on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/bronxnettvFollow us on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/company/bronxnet-community-television